Qatar Lays Downstream Foundation in North Africa

As investors and development teams from Europe and the United States keep their cautious distance from the uncertainty of North Africa after the Arab Spring, some financial support and confidence is arriving on the Mediterranean shores, perhaps none more substantial than that of Qatar.

Active and present from early on in the rapidly changing capitals of Cairo and Tunis, Qatari representatives have stepped up their support in recent weeks, signaling a willingness to contribute, including downstream efforts that could prove vital to the region’s recovery and future growth.

Eager to strengthen ties in the region, especially in those states that have seen a shift in political leadership over the past year, Qatar began outlining a series of financial programs earlier this year. In Tunisia, a dormant refinery project was revived in May after Qatar announced that they would again put forth the $2 billion necessary to support a refinery project that could see the country’s output capacity increase fourfold. Boasting an initial output of 120,000 bpd, the plant will eventually produce 250,000 bpd upon completion, as well as 1,200 jobs. By aiding in a post-Tunisia’s efforts to reduce heavy dependence on foreign energy resources and even move them towards a possible role as refined product exports, Qatar is hoping to sew the seeds of good will with the post-Ben Ali government.

In addition to cultivating a relationship with the new government in Libya, Qatar has also worked to help the development of downstream energy projects in a post-revolution Egypt. Earlier this year, Qatar announced a $3.7 billion financing agreement with the Egyptian Refining Company to help support a refining project there, with the Qatar Petroleum set to take on a 25.3 percent stake in the effort, according to a Bloomberg report. Shortly after, the Qatar Investment authority announced a sprawling $18 billion investment plan, with $8 billion set aside for electricity and natural gas projects to the East of the Suez Canal.

The expansion of a North African footprint comes as Qatar has extended its reach into the energy sector, including several recent purchases and expansions of stakes in energy companies across North Africa and Europe. The new funding agreements also challenge the tide of recent state and private investors who have acted with caution when dealing with North African nations.

Image: North Africa United

Originally Posted in Newsbase’s Downstream MENA Issue

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