A Spotlight on Greece’s Energy Potential But Roadblocks Remain

As Athens struggles to find a viable path out of Greece’s current economic morass, the country’s oil and gas potential have come under scrutiny as possible keys to future growth. However, despite early reports detailing potential across the Eastern Mediterranean and Aegean seas, accessing those reserves may prove more difficult than government officials are letting on.

According to NBC News, Prime Minister Antonis Samaras released a study earlier this summer suggesting as much as $600 billion worth of offshore natural gas in waters accessible by Greece. The report pointed to 3.5 Tcm and the equivalent of 1.5 billion barrels of oil off the southern coast of Crete that might equal or surpass reserves found in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. The Levantine Basin is currently the focus of a surge in activity and investment from Cyprus and Israel.

In hopes of replicating the Eastern Mediterranean natural gas rush, Athens has begun offering licensing rounds and seismic studies of the region to move forward with a sector that they feel could be a path towards erasing their debt and addressing the heavy costs of current energy imports. Greece currently spends about 5 percent of GDP on foreign oil and gas each year.

Despite such potential, reaching Greece’s reserves could be particularly challenging and unrealistic for short-term economic recovery efforts. Facing significant pressure from Brussels to reign in spending and address massive debt obligations, Athens has pursued a program of austerity that has done little to ensure political stability or investment confidence.

With little funding to spare and possible benefits years off, the idea of dedicating money to early hydrocarbon development appears increasingly impractical in the eyes of the country’s economically stressed population. The country’s licensing rounds offer one path forward, but it is still too early to tell whether foreign investors are willing to enter the still volatile Greek economy. Further, the country’s privatization push includes the sale of domestic natural gas provider DEPA and its transmission system operator, making the bridge between significant future hydrocarbon revenues and the state all the more unclear.

Still, Athens appears willing to move forward with the energy exploration effort and has also begun exploring the possibility of establishing themselves as a transmission hub for gas from the Levantine Basin when Cypriot and Israeli efforts begin to mature.

Image: Hellenext

Originally Posted: Newsbase EurOil Monitor

 

 

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