Monthly Archives: April 2013

Italian Offshore Back on Track but Progress Has Been Limited

ImageAlmost a year after Rome reversed a ban on offshore drilling, Italy’s energy sector is showing signs of life with new efforts and interest on the part of foreign firms.

This month has seen progress reported by   Petroceltic, Northern Petroleum and Mediterranean Oil and Gas regarding offshore efforts in Italian waters. However, despite such advancements, progress has been limited in improving the country’s overall energy standing – a situation made worse by a toxic political and economic environment and local opposition.

The Mario Monti government announced an end to a ban on drilling within five nautical miles of Italian shores that had been put into place following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.

The purpose of the government’s reversal on offshore drilling last year was two-fold. First, an increase in domestic production would help ease the country’s current, heavy dependence on foreign producers. Italy brings in about 90 percent of its oil and gas needs from outside the country and has seen alternative energy options evaporate over the last three years, making those imports all the more important. While renewable development has suffered amid a wave of government cuts and a loss of investor confidence brought on by the country’s economic crisis, Italy’s push to reintroduce nuclear power disappeared almost as soon as news of Japan’s Fukushima disaster reached Rome.

Second, the financial benefits of a boost in domestic production could help jumpstart Italy’s ailing economy, offering little in the way of investment options to outside investors. When the Monti government announced the plan to ditch the offshore ban, the country’s Economic Development Minister Corrado Passera predicted that expected increases in output allowed by the revision could bring in as much as 15 billion euros, while reducing the country’s energy bill by about 6 billion euros, according to Bloomberg.

Nearly a year on from the ban reversal, Italy’s energy options have offered little relief due to a precarious economic and political environment as well as instability in Algeria and Libya, two of the country’s largest providers of oil and gas.

Complicating the offshore situation still further has been the actions of local environmental and political advocacy groups. Even before the 2010 ban had been into place, groups in Sicily and along the Adriatic coast had pushed for drilling bans in the name of environmental and tourism protection. Although the ban has been reversed on a national level, local groups have still challenged exploration efforts in individual cases leading to production delays.

Offshore may have returned to Italy, but it is still far from clear whether it can provide the diversification and revenues

Image: Rigzone.com

Originally Posted: Newsbase Euroil Monitor

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Northern Mali Threat Continues to Cast Shadow Over Algerian Energy

ImageDespite the apparent success of a French-led military force in ridding Northern Mali from an armed separatist movement, recent violence has suggested that significant challenges remain to both that country and the energy sectors of its neighbors.

As recently as this past weekend, a car bomb and violence were reported in Timbuktu, once again highlighting the uncertainty of the region and the challenges of those in the region in need of a more stable business environment.

As much of North Africa has struggled with wide-ranging political opposition movements, resulting in the collapse of long-standing governments, Algeria has remained unchallenged by protest efforts. Rather, threats to the country’s stability have come from outside, with substantial pressure coming from a stretch of Mali along the country’s southern border. The country has struggled with an armed separatist movement for months, which seized authority from national troops late last year.

This pressure boiled over into Algeria in January with a coordinated raid on a BP gas site, spurring a messy government response and ending with the death of 38 foreign workers. The impact was immediate, with foreign firms suggesting delays to protect their personnel and neighboring Libya promising swift action against any similar events.  

More than just an unfortunate turn of events for a country that relies heavily on energy revenues for just about every aspect of government spending, the event presented a real threat to vital foreign investment needed to strengthen and expand the country’s infrastructure.  Algeria currently boasts access to about 12.2 billion barrels in oil reserves and 159 tcf of natural gas, with the U.S. as one of their largest trading partners.

However, a recent decline in local production and a push to tap into the country’s sizable shale potential have highlighted the role of foreign investment in the country’s immediate energy growth plans. To reach new output goals, Algeria will contribute billions from their own coffers towards boosting downstream capacity, but they will also need to partner with foreign partners who can offer the investment support and technical know-how needed to boost production exploit shale reserves in the near future.

Algeria has promoted substantial shale potential, attracting a number of necessary foreign firms to their shores, each providing the equipment and experience needed for the introduction of shale to the region. Keeping them in place may prove a little more difficult unless Algeria can provide a more stable working environment, making the kind of flare-ups seen this week all the more damaging.  

Originally Posted: Newsbase’s MEA Downstream Monitor

Photo: Mem.algeria.com

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