Spanish Oil and Gas Adjusting to New Reality

Facing a sustained economic crisis and unfavorable legislative responses, many in Spain’s energy sector are working furiously to adjust expectations and strategies for what could be a very different domestic marketplace.

The country’s new energy reality became a bit clearer at the end of last month as a collapse in local demand and stronger than expected needs from across Europe helped make Spain a net diesel exporter for the first time on record, according to a Reuters report. The shift was also the result of 5 billion euros in refinery upgrades over the last few years, increasing Spanish capacity and helping avoid one facility closure. While this development stems from Spain’s diminished domestic diesel market, reflecting slower growth and demand, it has provided a way for needed revenue from stronger diesel demand elsewhere in Europe.

Meanwhile, larger firms, including Repsol and Gas Natural, have worked to insulate themselves against the diminished Spanish and wider European demand by attempting to expand their footprint in emerging markets in South America and North Africa. Despite these efforts, many have faced further challenges at home thanks in part to exposure to the domestic market and the weight of the country’s sovereign debt challenges. In early October, Standard & Poor’s downgraded energy giant Gas Natural from stable to negative as concerns grew around a possible sovereign bailout appeal by Madrid.  On October 19th, Reuters reported a slight reprieve for the energy sector as the government sidestepped a lowering to junk rating on sovereign debt, though considering the government’s current energy debt and status, this development hardly brings them out of the woods.

For the country’s natural gas actors, further adjustments may soon be necessary thanks to a revised national tax program that will apply a 6 percent flat rate on power generation, as well as an additional “green tax” for gas-fire generation. Alongside the government’s recent cuts in energy subsidies, this new tax is part of an effort to ease Spain’s current energy deficit of around 24 billion euros.

Image: Eurogascorp.com

Originally Posted in Newsbase’s Euroil Monitor

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cairo’s Sinai Efforts Falling Short

Weeks after the Egyptian government pledged action to halt growing unrest in the Sinai Peninsula, military action appears to have had minimal effect on stopping violence and safeguarding the country’s energy trade route to Jordan.

The promised action followed months of growing instability in the region, beginning shortly after the fall of the government of Hosni Mubarak. In addition to a growing number of kidnappings, the Sinai saw 15 direct attacks on natural gas pipelines bound for Jordan and Israel. In early August, a single attack that led to the deaths of 16 Egyptian soldiers spurred newly elected President Mohammed Morsi to launch a military initiative aimed at bringing the region back under control. However, as recently as this weekend, attacks have continued, including one that resulted in the deaths of three police officers in El-Arish.

This latest event was followed by the dismissal of the North Sinai security chief, General Ahmed Bakr as well as protests among local police groups demanding greater attention from government forces and the passage of emergency laws. In response, Morsi once again pledged direct action, but will likely face resistance from a local Bedouin population with a long history of conflict with Cairo.

In addition to the clear goal of returning order to the country’s eastern region, the government’s efforts are especially important to protecting a natural gas export route to Jordan and beyond. Although exports from Egypt have recently halted as Cairo deals with a surge in local consumption and dwindling supply, the country’s ability to exploit domestic reserves for future growth will rely on a dependable export route to the east. According to a Jordan Times report, talks between the two governments have suggested that exports could resume as soon as next month, with a possible boost in quantity on the table.

While the government is working to address local consumption issues through a reassessment of subsidy programs and energy diversification, they have also begun pushing for greater exploration efforts, including both on and offshore projects. Recently, the Morsi government offered tenders for fifteen on- and offshore blocks for natural gas exploration.

Image: The Guardian

Originally Posted in Newsbase’s MEA Downstream Monitor

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A Spotlight on Greece’s Energy Potential But Roadblocks Remain

As Athens struggles to find a viable path out of Greece’s current economic morass, the country’s oil and gas potential have come under scrutiny as possible keys to future growth. However, despite early reports detailing potential across the Eastern Mediterranean and Aegean seas, accessing those reserves may prove more difficult than government officials are letting on.

According to NBC News, Prime Minister Antonis Samaras released a study earlier this summer suggesting as much as $600 billion worth of offshore natural gas in waters accessible by Greece. The report pointed to 3.5 Tcm and the equivalent of 1.5 billion barrels of oil off the southern coast of Crete that might equal or surpass reserves found in the Eastern Mediterranean Levantine Basin. The Levantine Basin is currently the focus of a surge in activity and investment from Cyprus and Israel.

In hopes of replicating the Eastern Mediterranean natural gas rush, Athens has begun offering licensing rounds and seismic studies of the region to move forward with a sector that they feel could be a path towards erasing their debt and addressing the heavy costs of current energy imports. Greece currently spends about 5 percent of GDP on foreign oil and gas each year.

Despite such potential, reaching Greece’s reserves could be particularly challenging and unrealistic for short-term economic recovery efforts. Facing significant pressure from Brussels to reign in spending and address massive debt obligations, Athens has pursued a program of austerity that has done little to ensure political stability or investment confidence.

With little funding to spare and possible benefits years off, the idea of dedicating money to early hydrocarbon development appears increasingly impractical in the eyes of the country’s economically stressed population. The country’s licensing rounds offer one path forward, but it is still too early to tell whether foreign investors are willing to enter the still volatile Greek economy. Further, the country’s privatization push includes the sale of domestic natural gas provider DEPA and its transmission system operator, making the bridge between significant future hydrocarbon revenues and the state all the more unclear.

Still, Athens appears willing to move forward with the energy exploration effort and has also begun exploring the possibility of establishing themselves as a transmission hub for gas from the Levantine Basin when Cypriot and Israeli efforts begin to mature.

Image: Hellenext

Originally Posted: Newsbase EurOil Monitor

 

 

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Algeria’s Downstream Deficit on Display

The impact of Algeria’s downstream deficit became clear this month as a tighter European refining market threatened a series of gasoline deliveries scheduled for mid-October. Despite substantial oil and gas reserves and high export rates to the United States and Europe, Algeria does not currently offer the downstream capacity to meet growing domestic needs. Recent refinery closures and site maintenance in Europe and a sharp increase in car ownership locally have exacerbated the country’s energy challenges by reducing accessibility to refined products, according to a Platts report and comments from Energy Minister Youcef Yousfi.

As of January 2012, Algeria boasted a total crude oil refining capacity of 450,000 bpd at four facilities. This capacity is not on track to meet rising domestic demand for refined materials, promoting an increase reliance on imports, which rose from 1.3 million tones in 2010 to 2.3 million tones in 2011. This situation has hardly been helped this year with the six-month closure of their largest facility, the 335,000 bpd refinery at Skikda in July 2012.

To address this deficit, Algeria has launched a series of renovation efforts at each of the facilities with an aim of being able to increase output to meet domestic demand by 2014. These efforts include the construction of a Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) plant and three Liquefied Gas Facilities at the Skikda location, an expansion of 20,000 bpd at the Algiers location, an increase of 30,000bpd at the Arzew location and a plan to build three new LNG trains at the Hassi Messaoud site.

In addition to improving sites to meet current demand, Algeria must also prepare for expanded production efforts, including both traditional, unconventional shale and the country’s push into offshore exploration. Recently, the country’s government and state-backed oil and gas firm Sonatrach unveiled an expanded $80 billion energy investment plan, with about $60 billion set aside for exploration efforts. The government also revised the country’s hydrocarbon laws to appeal to foreign firms willing to support investment into shale projects.

According to a Bloomberg report, Sonatrach CEO Abdelhamid Zerguine has stated that the North African country offers an estimated 2 trillion cubic meters of shale gas which they base on tests carried out in three provinces over 180,000 sq. km.

Image: Arabian Oil and Gas

Originally Posted: Newsbase Downstream MEA Monitor

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Tunisia and an Undefined Shale Future

As the rush to exploit shale reserves continues across the globe, Tunisia’s potential has come into the spotlight due to a number of conflicting reports from interested foreign firms and the country’s new government.

Facing expected increases in local demand and a weakened post-Arab Spring economy, which contracted 1.8 percent last year, a Tunisian shale boom would be a helpful step forward in terms of energy security and growth. While modest in comparison to larger shale markets, most notably the United States and China and to a lesser degree, Poland, Tunisia’s shale estimates suggest enough potential to change the energy landscape of this country of 10.5 million. According to a U.S. Energy Intelligence Agency report, as of 2009, Tunisia offered approximately 18 trillion cubic feet of technically recoverable shale gas.

However, despite clearly stated interest on the part of several foreign firms and a lack of viable hydrocarbon alternatives, Tunisia’s current transitional government has avoided a clear embrace of the often-controversial extraction process.

A Growing Caution

As countries across the globe rush to replicate the progress seen in the United States over the last decade, many have rushed to partner with foreign partners with more direct experience with the costly and very technical shale extraction process, known as hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”. The extraction, according to the UPI, “involves drilling into the rocks horizontally and then cracking them with a high-pressure missile of water mixed with sand and chemicals, to unlock the gas from the impermeable shale rock.”

The complexities of this process and the environmental risks involved have made introducing shale projects difficult into new markets increasingly difficult. Bolstered by reporting and advocacy groups in the United States, opposition has grown due to concern about possible harmful waste, water supplies and the potential impact irresponsible development could have on the local environment and aquifers.  This has resulted in partial or outright bans on shale efforts across Europe and delays in government approval in several more countries.

Early reports suggest that these concerns may have had a hand in the delay or outright denial of licensing rights for shale projects in Tunisia. In late September, Tunisia’s Industry Ministry were pushed to respond to reports that they were preparing to grant an unconventional license to Shell in the Kairouan region of the country. Denying the completed agreement, the Ministry announced that while they had received a related application, they had responded with an appeal for an environmental and water impact analysis, according to an Al Bawaba report.

The water usage issue related to “fracking”, which can require millions of gallons for each well, is especially important for the arid North African region. The Ministry release did allow that government was considering shale options, stating, “Tunisia is mulling over producing shale gas to meet its growing domestic demand and the expected drop in traditional oil stock”.

However, just a few days later, the African Manager website reported that a source close to the case stated that shale efforts would likely be abandoned completely by the current government thanks to concerns about the potential environmental impact. While unconfirmed outside of that source, the report does reflect the lack of a clear narrative about the country’s current position on introducing shale efforts.

Ready and Waiting

However the country decides, they will have a number of potential partners to held lay a shale foundation. Earlier this year, Shell announced plans to pursue unconventional efforts in both Tunisia and neighboring Algeria, which has been much more assertive in their support for shale development. So far, Algiers has signed production agreements with Italy’s Eni and Shell, among others. Going so far as to introduce new hydrocarbon legislation to entice foreign investment in unconventional energy projects, Algeria has set a course for energy diversification, addressing a steady increase in domestic demand and allowing an increase in export revenue.

For Tunisia, the addition of shale to the country’s energy options would address more modest goals of just easing dependence on costly refined oil imports and the burden of steadily declining local oil reserves.

In addition to Shell, Winstar Resources have also expressed a strong interest in pursing what they feel is Tunisia’s vas energy potential. Despite reports of a possible sale of their Tunisian interests earlier this year, the Canadian company included a positive outlook of their access to the country’s shale potential in their August, second quarter corporate report. Earlier this year, representatives from Italy’s Eni suggested they might extend their shale reach beyond Algeria and were “thinking of entering the Tunisian shale gas market,” according to a Dow Jones report.

In late September, the country’s shale reserves also took center stage at the second annual Tunisia Oil and Gas Summit, where the keynote session explored Tunisia’s unconventional, including input from a number of foreign E&P firms and sponsor Halliburton. The US company has been at the forefront of shale excavation technology for decades.

It should be noted that even if the country’s transitional government side against introducing shale to the Tunisian landscape, presidential and parliamentary elections have now been scheduled for June of next year. With new leadership in sight, any opposition could face a limited lifespan. For their part, Shell has not included any information about unconventional projects in their online literature related to Tunisia, but did recently announce a $150 million oil exploration deal in the country.

Image: Agency Tunis African Press

Originally Posted: Newsbase’s AfrOil Monitor

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Algeria Revises Hydrocarbon Law But Real Sector Changes Remain Unclear

After months of speculation, Algeria’s Council of Ministers finally announced that they had passed a revised hydrocarbon law, erasing the outdated 2005 legislation in hopes of reversing the country’s waning production levels. However, lacking precise details and missing expected reforms for existing projects, the new law ‘s impact on the country’s weakened production efforts may not have the impact they hoped for.

Passed earlier this month, the legislation was accompanied by an announcement from the national government outlining a plan that focuses on creating a more inviting investment environment for potential development partners who can help Algeria make the most of their potential shale reserves. However, the revisions appear to have little effect on existing or more traditional efforts, which have seen a steady decline in recent years.

According to a Bloomberg report, Algeria is sitting on an expected 2 trillion cubic meters of shale gas which they base on tests carried out in three provinces over 180,000 sq. km. However, reaching the country’s reserves remains a challenge for the government and its state-backed firm Sonatrach because of high initial production costs and a lack of domestic experience and equipment.  The shale push figures into the country’s wider $80 billion energy sector investment plan over the next five years, with 60 percent of funds dedicated to excavation and production efforts, including “150 exploratory wells and expand crude-processing capacity at three oil refineries.”

To meet the requirements of launching a local shale effort, Algeria has turned to foreign partners to help guide the process and provide needed technical experience, including Italy’s Eni, Royal Dutch Shell and Exxon Mobil. The new legislation was meant to appeal to these firms, opening up significant new streams of revenue to a country heavily dependent on hydrocarbon exports to meet government spending needs.

An Uncertain Energy Landscape

Almost exclusively dependent on oil and natural gas revenue to fund government spending and operations, Algeria has long realized known that the secret to keeping the country politically and socially calm is a strong energy sector. However, in recent years, sector uncertainty and misuse helped create a working environment seen as hostile to a number of necessary foreign firms, leading to both cancellation of existing projects and dwindling interest in new ones. The most glaring example of the country’s waning attractiveness to outside investors came with a round of ten possible licenses which attracted only two bids, one of which came from the country’s state-backed energy firm, Sonatrach.

The decline began with the adoption of new revenue sharing laws and taxes in 2005, including a new policy in 2006 that would impose heavy costs on revenue when oil climbed over $30 a barrel. Interest continued to waver, spurring a decline in the country’s output, which dropped more 5 percent in 2009 alone. Algeria’s production environment grew more and more unattractive to foreign investors, spurring threats from international firms that they would leave if conditions did not improve.

This process began with a wide-reaching corruption investigation at Sonatrach, resulting in an overhaul of the company’s leadership. Accused of selling exploration rights and claims to family members and friends, the Sonatrach leadership was shown the door in a way Algiers hoped would rebuild some level of confidence among international investors.

The energy sector leadership in Algiers continued this process with new support for novel avenues of local exploration, including new natural gas efforts and adopting unconventional strategies, including seeking out the kind of deep-set shale reserves that have transformed energy markets in North America, China and potentially Argentina. However, Algeria realized that to diversify, they must seek out ways to appeal to wary funding partners abroad.

In order to appeal to necessary foreign production partners, Algerian officials announced a revision earlier this summer, noting that an overhaul was necessary because the 2005 law was passed when pricing and technology required a very different approach to excavation and production strategies.

Now passed and announced by the government, the legislation has fallen short of analyst expectations, including keeping a 51-49 percent ownership requirement for Sonatrach in place. Additionally, the new laws will not apply on existing excavation projects, giving little relief to those companies already operating in country. Instead, government officials announced only that undefined tax incentives would be offered to foreign partners to encourage unconventional efforts, which require significant investments in technology and personnel.

An Wider Expansion Effort

Algeria’s move into unconventional exploration efforts comes as the country tries to broaden their energy base, for the benefit of both growing domestic demand and vital revenue streams. In addition to supporting the development of shale projects, Algeria has also begun appealing to development partners for renewable projects to the tune of $60 billion, according to a Bloomberg report. The push is intended to move the country towards a 40 percent adoption of renewable power by 2030, easing domestic demand and increasing the amount of domestic hydrocarbon reserves available for export.

Image: Sweet Crude Report

Originally Posted: Newsbase’s Afroil Monitor

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Italy Tables All Options for Energy Needs

Over that past 24 months, a series of unfortunate events have chipped away at Italy’s already narrow energy options. Compounded by the country’s current economic morass, Italy’s energy sector has been left struggling to find an effective path forward. Now considering and promoting production relationships and strategies long thought to be off the table, the Southern European nation faces an uphill battle towards energy security. With new local efforts and legislation in the pipeline, Rome is hoping for some good news soon. However, with only modest domestic potential and an uncertain political landscape beyond its own border, the question remains, will it be enough?

Long dependent on foreign resources for most of its energy needs, Italy witnessed its limited options for meeting domestic demand fade over the last two years due mostly in part to events far from home. After the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico spurred a ban on offshore drilling in waters within five miles of the Italian coastline, the country suffered another hit to available energy options as the political situation in North Africa flared up. While Algeria, which provides substantial contributions to Italy’s natural gas needs, largely escaped widespread political protests, neighboring Libya did not. After spending a decade and billions of dollars cultivating an energy trade relationship with the government of Muamar Gadaffi, Italy was knocked back to square one as the government fell to opposition movements based in the oil-capital of Benghazi. Left to build a new relationship with a Libyan leadership wary of anyone who had worked closely with the ousted government, Italy then faced pressure from the United States to cut ties with Iran who provided significant amounts of crude to the Italian market. Finally, the country’s unconventional options were dinged by a cash-strapped renewable subsidy program and a nuclear resurgence that fizzled as Japan’s Fukishima disaster reminded Italians why they’d banned it in the first place.

Two years on, Italy is now putting all options on the table to help achieve some sort of progress towards energy security, starting with the ban that started it all. This month saw the Italian government look past public and political protests that came to define the Deepwater Horizon summer and announce that they would re-open coastal waters to exploration efforts. This move has cleared the way for those smaller operations, most notably Mediterranean Oil and Gas, to return to local waters.

This month also saw Rome granted a 180 day reprieve from the US and EU-led sanctions against Iranian crude, allowing some breathing room to help cultivate or expand new trade agreements to replace expected losses. Of all those EU member states expected to be affected by a cut off in Iranian crude, Italy and Spain emerged as those nations with the most to lose. To do this, Italy has looked to expand their presence in Algeria, where the state-associated Italian firm Eni has signed on to help support the expansion of shale gas projects in North Africa. They are also now waiting on final approval for the construction of the planned Galsi Pipeline, which would increase the natural gas flow from Algeria to the Italian market by way of Sardinia.

After quickly reversing their support for the Gadaffi government after violence split Libya in half last year, Italy and Eni have worked to build a strong energy relationship with Tripoli and Benghazi, including a pledge to dedicate several billions towards production and infrastructure development over the next decade.

However, the country’s continuing challenges with security and political stability have caused some concern whether foreign firms will be able to stage full returns to production. This has become especially worrisome in recent weeks as violence spurred direct diplomatic warnings to outsiders operating in the country’s eastern half, also home to the majority of Libya’s oil and natural gas operations, as well as the recently re-opened Ras Lanuf refinery. Even before this month’s direct attack on a US consulate in Benghazi, energy firms had stepped up protection and prevention efforts following a series of actions taken against Western operations in the country.

Locally, Italy has also moved to encourage the country’s natural gas competition with the planned purchase of a 30 percent stake in Snam – the natural gas distribution unit. The deal comes thanks to the government’s sale of 1.7 percent of their stake in Eni, earning them $1.4 billion towards the Snam effort. According to an Associated Press report, Snam has pledged to spend $8.8 billion towards infrastructure development across Italy.

While the country’s economic challenges of the last three years have hardly helped Italy’s energy options, they may have helped only in easing domestic demand, noted in a Reuters report from this week. According to the report, Italy has seen a steady decline in demand for energy products, including 10.1 percent decrease in petrol during the month of August and 8.6 percent for oil products during the same period. Overall, during the first eight months of 2011, “demand for oil products fell 8.6 percent year-on year 43.32 million tonnes, with petrol demand falling 9.7 percent and diesel demand down 9.1 percent.”

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Qatar Lays Downstream Foundation in North Africa

As investors and development teams from Europe and the United States keep their cautious distance from the uncertainty of North Africa after the Arab Spring, some financial support and confidence is arriving on the Mediterranean shores, perhaps none more substantial than that of Qatar.

Active and present from early on in the rapidly changing capitals of Cairo and Tunis, Qatari representatives have stepped up their support in recent weeks, signaling a willingness to contribute, including downstream efforts that could prove vital to the region’s recovery and future growth.

Eager to strengthen ties in the region, especially in those states that have seen a shift in political leadership over the past year, Qatar began outlining a series of financial programs earlier this year. In Tunisia, a dormant refinery project was revived in May after Qatar announced that they would again put forth the $2 billion necessary to support a refinery project that could see the country’s output capacity increase fourfold. Boasting an initial output of 120,000 bpd, the plant will eventually produce 250,000 bpd upon completion, as well as 1,200 jobs. By aiding in a post-Tunisia’s efforts to reduce heavy dependence on foreign energy resources and even move them towards a possible role as refined product exports, Qatar is hoping to sew the seeds of good will with the post-Ben Ali government.

In addition to cultivating a relationship with the new government in Libya, Qatar has also worked to help the development of downstream energy projects in a post-revolution Egypt. Earlier this year, Qatar announced a $3.7 billion financing agreement with the Egyptian Refining Company to help support a refining project there, with the Qatar Petroleum set to take on a 25.3 percent stake in the effort, according to a Bloomberg report. Shortly after, the Qatar Investment authority announced a sprawling $18 billion investment plan, with $8 billion set aside for electricity and natural gas projects to the East of the Suez Canal.

The expansion of a North African footprint comes as Qatar has extended its reach into the energy sector, including several recent purchases and expansions of stakes in energy companies across North Africa and Europe. The new funding agreements also challenge the tide of recent state and private investors who have acted with caution when dealing with North African nations.

Image: North Africa United

Originally Posted in Newsbase’s Downstream MENA Issue

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Ras Lanuf Re-Opens But Libyan Recovery Doubts Remain

As Libya became the center of global attention for all the wrong reasons last week, the country’s energy sector took a significant step towards recovery as deliveries from the Ras Lanuf refinery resumed after a year of closure. Responsible for more than half of the country’s oil and gas refined output, the return of production was a welcome step towards reaching and surpassing pre-conflict production levels.

However, lingering concerns about security throughout the country and a slowing production recovery have cast doubt on whether the country can continue to increase its output levels for both domestic energy and government spending needs.

According to the Libya Herald, Tripoli has outlined an annual operating budget of $55.3 billion and estimates they can earn $54.9 billion in oil and gas revenues over the next year. With little else in the way of exports or local development, Libya’s hydrocarbon output is the country’s surest way towards keeping the state moving towards stability and recovery. The reopening of the Ras Lanuf refinery after it was closed during last year’s civil war is a significant step in that direction.

Before closing its doors last year, Ras Lanuf was a leading producer of naptha and jet fuel and was capable of producing four cargoes of low-sulfur fuel oil a month, according to a Reuters report. After a series of delays, the plant came back online late last month, producing about half of its 220,000bpd capacity. The plant is overseen by the Libyan Emirati Refining Company, a joint-venture between Libya’s state oil company National Oil Corporation and UAE-based Al Ghurair group.

Despite the good news for the country’s recovering energy sector, the reopening comes as Libya’s return to pre-conflict levels has begun to slow. Earlier predictions that output would recover by this October as output began to stall around 1.38 million bpd in August, according to the Financial Times. Further recovery has also been shadowed by growing concerns that Libya’s security situation is not yet stable enough for a full return for much-needed international investors – a feeling that became very real last week as attacks on Western interests spurred strict travel warnings from the US and United Kingdom.

Originally Posted with Newsbase’s Downtream Monitor

Image: Maghreb Panorama

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Egyptian Downstream Impact Being Felt

As Egypt’s natural gas potential quickly emerges as one of the country’s strongest forces for recovery, its downstream sector is coming under increasing scrutiny as the reality of questionable capabilities and cancellations start to take effect.

Highly dependent on domestic natural gas reserves for both electricity production and export revenue, Egypt has placed the country’s promising sector at the heart of the post-Mubarak recovery. However, despite a steady increase in interest in exploration and production efforts from outside energy firms, Egypt’s downstream operations remain a sore spot for natural gas sector growth, affecting both needed earnings and domestic energy demand.

The most glowing example of this comes with the country’s pipeline system through the Sinai Peninsula, which has remained a volatile point of militant activity since the fall of the Mubarak government in February 2011. Since then, the pipelines allowing valuable exports to Israel and Jordan have been attacked on 15 occasions. These delays were followed by a cancellation of exports to Israel after the controversial nature of the two countries’ trade agreement became clear. The fragile state of Egypt’s Sinai pipelines claimed its first business victim recently when Israel’s Ampal filed for Chapter 11 due to the loss of revenue as a result of the halt in trade this past April. The company held 12.5 percent of EMG, the institution responsible for delivering Egyptian natural gas to Israel. While the company’s ability to meet debt obligations began as early as December 2011 thanks to the repeated attacks, the April cancellation proved to be the final straw for the firm, according to the Egyptian Ahram Online.

In addition to launching a military offensive in the region to help quell unrest, the Egyptian government is looking to outside funding options to help improve the downstream outlook. Some relief may come from a recently announced $18 billion investment pledge from Qatar, $10 billion of which has been set aside for gas, power, iron and steal plants, according to The Chicago Tribune.

Cairo’s largest energy challenges are rooted in the country’s generous oil and gas subsidy program, which increased 40 percent last year to cost the state $16 billion, or one-fifth of its operating budget, according to Reuters. However, the country’s downstream operations have also become an obstacle to recovery as outside interest has focused on E&P efforts, including a recent $10 billion BP plan over the next five years according to Bloomberg, instead of infrastructure investment.

Originally Posted with Newsbase’s Downstream Monitor

Image: Bloomberg

 

 

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