Tag Archives: Renewable

Spanish Scandal Could Force Energy Strategy Change

ImageAfter a turbulent first year of cuts aimed reducing a crippling deficit, Spain’s energy sector could see a shift in direction as a corruption scandal threatens the current conservative government.

Since taking office after early elections just before the New Year in 2011, the government led by Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy has led a campaign of cuts and adjustments meant to drive down an energy sector deficit that greeted them around $30 billion.  Attributing the daunting amount to unsustainable government subsidy programs, Rajoy and his Minister of Industry, José Manuel Soria set out a series of cuts that have spurred appeals to the European Commission and lawsuits from investment firms.

However, the fate of Mariano’s party leadership in Madrid has recently been cast into doubt amid allegations that senior officials had received secret cash payments after the practice was made illegal in 2007. Rajoy denied any wrong-doing following an extensive report published in Spain’s national daily, El Pais detailing payments to him as late as 2008. The El Pais report was quickly followed by calls for Rajoy’s resignation and denials from party officials.

While it is not yet clear whether a return to the Socialist leadership that led the country for eight years before Rajoy would signal a change in pace, it is even less clear whether voters would hand the reigns back to the left should the conservatives be forced from office. Recently, both of the country’s largest political parities have seen support erode thanks to their handling of the economic crisis. On the local level, this has allowed support to shift to smaller, less centrist parties.

However, even if Rajoy remains in power – which regional observers expect he will – the government’s approach to the energy sector will likely see a change in the New Year. Despite the government’s cuts and general deficit reduction strategy, the energy sector’s deficit has continued to rise in recent months casting doubt on their approach. While Soria and company predicted a slowdown as a result of the cuts, which have focused on solar and wind subsidies; the deficit has actually grown at double the expected rate. Soria has signaled a different approach in the coming year and insisted once again that further cuts will not include retroactive actions.

This expected reversal reflects a broader trend in Spanish economic improvement, which has largely relied on cuts in spending and services across the country’s seventeen communities. With unemployment continuing to rise and economic growth stagnant, Madrid and Brussels alike have suggested an approach that does not focus so much on austerity and may include additional efforts aimed at growth.

Image: Iberosphere.com

Originally Posted: Newsbase Euroil Monitor

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Morocco Offers Up Incentives for First Wave E&P

Dismissed by oil and gas majors for the last decade, Morocco is working to renew interest in their hydrocarbon potential through incentive and tax programs aimed at smaller operators in hopes of laying a foundation for future energy development.

The country’s efforts are driven by Morocco’s traditionally heavy dependence on outside energy resources, making the development of local production energy efforts all the more important for the country’s economic stability. Morocco is currently dependent on imports for 97 percent of its energy needs and has long aimed to reduce its dependence on foreign sources through the development of domestic projects, including exploring newly-found traditional reserves, shale projects and more recently, alternative energy plans.

Last week, Zac Philips, an oil and gas analyst at Fox Davies noted that while the country had largely been ignored by large capital operators in the past, Morocco’s incentives had provided significant opportunities for smaller firms like Circle, Longreach Oil and Gas, San Leon and Pura Vida to stake out claims in the Northwest African nation.

According to reports from companies active in the country, the Moroccan energy efforts have helped create one of the most hospitable in the region for outside firms, includes rules dictating that the state receive just 25 percent of any project, with a 5 percent royalty for a gas discovery and 10 percent for an oil find. Furthermore, the government offers a 10-year corporate tax holiday following a discovery. Compared to countries like Algeria, which can claim up to 92 percent of energy production efforts, the Moroccan experience has proven favorable to small capital firms in search of new frontiers.

While these incentives mean little without actual reserves, these openings have allowed the more modest operations to introduce both traditional and novel E&P strategies to blocks located on and off shore in what Philips believes to be an opportunity to clear the way for larger capital interest down the road.

Much of the renewed interest in Morocco’s oil and gas potential stems from shale potential and reports suggesting offshore similarities between the east and west Atlantic. Based on the fact that the continents were connected millions of years ago, the assumption is that they share similar natural resource reserves.

That potential has allowed a certain degree of confidence among firms active in the country, including Pura Vida who revised their resource estimates at the offshore Mazagan permit at the end of April, increasing from 2.6 to 3.2 billion barrels of oil following further analysis of the site.

Meanwhile, onshore, San Leon has worked to expand on its shale efforts in Poland with efforts in Morocco’s Zag and Tarfaya Basin licenses, reporting substantial potential reserves and an eagerness to seek out production partners for expansion, according to a January company release. Longreach Oil and Gas also reported strong progress this spring, with efforts at their Sidi Mokhtar licenses at the fore of their expanding presence in the country.

Despite the progress allowed by the country’s incentive and tax programs, it is unclear how long the country’s incentive and tax schemes will allow smaller capital firms to hold leadership positions in Morocco. Eventually, strong production levels will invite increased interest from majors like BP and Shell, casting companies like Longreach and Pura Vida as a first wave of progress rather than long-term partners.

A Broader Approach

The efforts also reflect a broader, more far-reaching approach to domestic energy production in Morocco that also entails substantial support for both traditional hydrocarbons and renewable energy, placing them at the forefront of such alternative sources in the region. As southern Europe’s green energy sector continues to slip under the pressure of the economic crisis and spending cuts, Morocco has worked to etch out a leadership position amid growing interest in solar and wind development, including a flagship 500MW solar plant, scheduled to begin construction this year.

In addition to encouraging energy production efforts, the Moroccan government has worked to increase their transport role in North Africa in hopes of establishing a stronger leadership role in the region. In February of this year, Morocco opened the country’s second oil terminal in the northern coastal town of Tangiers, increasing domestic storage and allowing greater access to busy shipping lines at the mouth of the Mediterranean.

The effort was the product of a group put together by Emirati Horizon Terminals Ltd., Moroccan company Afriquia SMDC and Kuwaiti firm Independent Petroleum Group, the $180 million terminal will hold 3.2 million barrels, with 53 percent dedicated to gas and diesel and 43 percent set aside for fuel oil and fuel additives, according to a Reuters report.

The country plans to further expand its importing reach with the development of a LNG terminal near Jorf Lasfar. The project has been under discussion since 2007, but was recently mentioned in remarks by the newly appointed Minister of Energy, Mines, Water and the Environment, Fouad Douiri.

One region, this energy focus is unlikely to reach is the contested Western Sahara, home to large potential oil and gas reserves, as well as a 36-year old dispute over authority. Despite reported progress earlier this years related to talks between Morocco and the Algeria-backed Polisario Front, this week saw Rabat dismiss United Nations efforts after losing confidence in envoy Christopher Ross, according to a Reuters report.

Image: Proactive Investors

Originally Published in Newsbase Afroil. All Rights Reserved

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Spain’s Energy Future Under Rajoy

As Spain prepares for the return of a Partido Popular government this month, under the leadership of incoming Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy, calls for greater clarity about policy decisions have become more pronounced and the country’s energy sector is no exception.

Swept into office in late November with a significant and clear Parliamentary majority, Rajoy and the PP were able to win without many specific details about their plans thanks in part to the deeply unpopular standing of the incumbent PSOE and outgoing José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero.  However, with the November 20th early elections out of the way, demands for a clear path forward are becoming more pronounced, including what the incoming government will do to address the country’s energy sector. While details remain vague, it appears that a PP government will provide a shift in industry priorities and financial support and fewer government regulations.

Long recognized as a leader in renewable energy efforts, Spain will likely see a reduction in attention and investment as the PP has promised cuts to government subsidies for solar and wind projects. Unlike fellow renewable leaders in German and Portugal, Spain did not pass the cost of renewable subsidies on to consumers, instead relying on state funding and the sale of government bonds, which has become unsustainable in recent months.

To compensate, Spain’s PP have signaled that they will push for less regulation over the country’s nuclear efforts, allowing plants to remain open for as long as they are deemed safe. In regards to more traditional efforts, the PP have stated that they will push Europe to allow for greater Spanish access to the European power grids, especially in terms of the country’s access to oil and natural gas pipelines into France. Meant to address the current narrow lines of transport, the push would establish Spain as a more dependable entry point for North African reserves into the European market, though they will have to overcome a long history of resistance from France.

The PP has not yet expressed support or concern about the growing shale efforts in Spain, anchored by new projects in the country’s northern Basque Country, though the PP’s aversion to greater regulation suggest less support for the sort of official push-back similar campaigns have seen in Germany, France and the UK. In more immediate terms, the government will likely to support an Energy Ministry push to compensate one of the country’s largest energy actors, Gas Natural, for legal fees accrued during a pricing dispute with Algeria’s Sonatrach to the tune of 157.3 million euro.

 

 

 

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